Tuesday, October 10, 2017

Bathroom Books, Bedroom Books, and Bus Books

We love to read, and if we're not talking or walking or watching news on TV, we're usually reading something. Computer screens frequently, either for research or keeping up with family and friends. Occasionally Kindle books.

But there's still no substitute for words on paper, a good book.

In bed, either late evening, trying to keep our eyelids open, or in the morning when we just don't want to get out of the comfort of the mattress and covers, which we have worked all night to perfect, it's usually a novel, often a crime mystery. In Scotland this month, we've both been reading an iconic local author, Ian Rankin, who is quite good, even if he does tend to wrap things up with minor characters who come late to the game with little or no foreshadowing.

On the bus, or more likely the train, it's often a mix of whatever novel we've been reading in bed (or on the couch), a free newspaper, or a magazine that caught our eye for a major article.

In the "reading room," the choices are more eclectic. Right now, in the downstairs loo, we've a choice between Bill Bryson's petulant and often humorous travels through Europe (20 years ago, but not much has really changed), a fiction-oriented magazine I suggested to D-L which turned out to be a collection of very badly written short stories,  and a recent MAD magazine, a juvenile humour favourite of mine as a teenager, which my stepdaughter kindly supplied from across the pond.

Upstairs, another Bryson on travels through the US, though I haven't gotten out of the endless-nothingness of the Midwest section. I like, though, that Bryson has "pauses," essentially sub-dividing a chapter into multiple sections, which is ideal whether your sit is short or long. The "She-Wolves" book on strong queens of England, including Eleanor of Aquataine, is more intriguing.

We've visited a couple of second-hand shoppes and bookstores, and picked up a few very cheap editions, including a copy of Rankin's first novel. A couple we'll manage to read before we fly back to Geneva, so will  leave for our gracious househost. The smaller ones should fit within the EasyJet luggage limits.

Just finished another Rankin yesterday, so need to browse the shelves again. Any recommendations?

1 comment:

  1. I like Bryson a lot but for awhile there I couldn't get many of his books on Kindle. Right now I'm reading The Dream of Scipio by Ian Pears and it's very good.

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